Drama Showrunner Roundtable:

It is an odd reversal of fate that television, which historically always strived to be more cinematic, would eventually feed our narrative appetites and desires far more substantively than the motion picture industry.  Over the luxurious course of many episodes – which then span multiple seasons – television can develop complex narrative machinations and develop characters in ways that cinema simply cannot. For decades, TV was relegated to the nutritional value of popcorn or trail mix at best. A full seven course meal, however, was Bergman, Ford, Fellini, Polanski, Welles… Or so this opinion was held for decades…

Drama Showrunner Roundtable: Watch the Full, Uncensored Conversation With Aaron Sorkin, Vince Gilligan, Matthew Weiner

 

The late 1990s and post-2000 era have seen a renaissance in television that is as fresh, original and brave as television’s original golden era. The legacy of I Love Lucy, Edward R. Murrow, Fred Friendly, John Frankenheimer, Playhouse 90, Hubble Robinson, Pat Weaver, Arthur Penn, Paddy Chayevsky and Rod Serling is beautifully honored amidst a sea of empty and cheap cable programming…

 

Of course, nowhere has any of this been more true than with HBO’s brilliant and, by any measurable criteria, “greatest” show of all time, THE WIRE.

 

The Wire